The reality of change 

May 6, 2017

The instant Panadol and maggi mee culture is very much alive and dangerous. We pop it in n instantly our pain and hunger disappear. We thought we can do the same with governance or our well being or state of the nation. Change Our leaders or change the political landscape n our problems will disappear. 

In reality it has to be work in progress, it is about us in the little communities that we serve that will make the lasting change for better or for worse.


My Neighbor is a Cham 

May 4, 2017

I had an interesting conversation with a neighbor yesterday. We had been acquainted for years but yesterday he intimated to me his family history. 
I thot he was another Malay neighbor. No he is not. He is a Cham. His father was the last mufti of Cambodia before the Khmer Rouge. He escaped the KR sweep of anyone who could read or write. 
He remembered his big family house in between the Mekong and the Tonle Sap. The family owned properties in Phnom Penh but now every single one has been taken over by others. Now worth millions of USD as it is in the CBD. 
The majority of his family escaped. Thankful he was, that their life has been spared and Malaysia their new country has been kind to them.


Answer to Feminism by Yasmin Mogahed

April 28, 2017

Apr 24, 2017

Question by Sarah

On March 18, 2005 Amina Wadud led the first female-led Jumu`ah Prayer. On that day, women took a huge step towards being more like men. But, did we come closer to actualizing our God-given liberation

Answer by Yasmin 

Salam Sarah,
Thank you for your inspiring question!

Well, answering your question, I can say that I don’t think so.

What we so often forget is that God has honored women by giving them value in relation to God—not in relation to men. But as Western feminism erases God from the scene, there is no standard left but men.

As a result, the Western feminist is forced to find her value in relation to a man. And in so doing, she has accepted a faulty assumption. She has accepted that man is the standard, and thus a woman can never be a full human being until she becomes just like a man—the standard.

When a man cut his hair short, she wanted to cut her hair short. When a man joined the army, she wanted to join the army, and so on. She wanted these things for no other reason than because the “standard” had it.

What she didn’t recognize was that God dignifies both men and women in their distinctiveness, not their sameness. And on March 18, Muslim women made the very same mistake.

For 1,400 years, there has been a consensus of scholars that men are to lead prayer. As a Muslim woman, why does this matter? The one who leads prayer is not spiritually superior in any way.

Something is not better just because a man does it. And leading Prayer is not better just because it is leading.

Had it been the role of women or had it been more divine, why wouldn’t the Prophet have asked Lady `A’ishah or Lady Khadijah, or Lady Fatimah—the greatest women of all time—to lead?

These women were promised heaven and yet they never led prayer.

But now, for the first time in 1,400 years, we look at a man leading prayer and we think, “that’s not fair.” We think so, although God has given no special privilege to the one who leads. The imam is no higher in the eyes of God than the one who prays behind him.

On the other hand, only a woman can be a mother. And the Creator has given special privilege to a mother. The Prophet taught us that heaven lies at the feet of mothers. But no matter what a man does, he can never be a mother. So why is that not unfair?

When asked who is most deserving of our kind treatment? The Prophet replied “your mother” three times before saying “your father” only once. Isn’t that sexist? No matter what a man does, he will never be able to have the status of a mother.

And yet even when God honors us with something uniquely feminine, we are too busy trying to find our worth in reference to men, to value it or even notice it. We too have accepted men as the standard; so anything uniquely feminine is, by definition, “inferior”.

Being sensitive is an insult, becoming a mother is a degradation. In the battle between stoic rationality (considered masculine) and selfless compassion (considered feminine), rationality reigns supreme.

As soon as we accept that everything a man has and does is better, all that follows is just a knee jerk reaction: if men have it, we want it too. If men pray in the front rows, we assume this is better, so we want to pray in the front rows too.

If men lead prayer, we assume the imam is closer to God, so we want to lead prayer too.

Somewhere along the line, we’ve accepted the notion that having a position of worldly leadership is some indication of one’s position with God.

A Muslim woman does not need to degrade herself in this way. She has God as a standard. She has God to give her value; she doesn’t need a man here.

In fact, in our crusade to follow men, we, as women, never even stopped to examine the possibility that what we have is better for us. In some cases, we even gave up what was higher only to be like men.

Fifty years ago, we saw men leaving the home to work in factories. We were mothers. And yet, we saw men doing it, so we wanted to do it too. Somehow, we considered it women’s liberation to abandon the raising of another human being in order to work on a machine.

We accepted that working in a factory was superior to raising the foundation of society—just because a man did it.

Then after working, we were expected to be superhuman—the perfect mother, the perfect wife, the perfect homemaker, and have the perfect career. And while there is nothing wrong, by definition, with a woman having a career, we soon came to realize what we had sacrificed by blindly mimicking men.

We watched as our children became strangers, and soon recognized the privilege we’d given up.

And so only now—given the choice—women in the West are choosing to stay home to raise their children. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, only 31 percent of mothers with babies, and 18 percent of mothers with two or more children, are working full time.

And of those working mothers, a survey conducted by Parenting Magazine in 2000, found that 93 percent of them say they would rather be home with their kids, but are compelled to work due to “financial obligations.”

These “obligations” are imposed on women by the gender sameness of the modern West and removed from women by the gender distinctiveness of Islam.

It took women in the West almost a century of experimentation to realize a privilege given to Muslim women 1,400 years ago. Given my privilege as a woman, I only degrade myself by trying to be something I’m not, and in all honesty, don’t want to be—a man.

As women, we will never reach true liberation until we stop trying to mimic men and value the beauty in our own God given distinctiveness.

If given a choice between stoic justice and compassion, I choose compassion. And if given a choice between worldly leadership and heaven at my feet, I choose heaven.

I hope my words answer your question. In case you have any comment or you need more about the topic, please don’t hesitate to contact us again. Thank you and please keep in touch.

Salam.


Salam Greetings

April 27, 2017

The giving of Salam and to answer the greetings in a more pleasant manner is in the Quran. To me It is about the equality and the brotherhood of men. 

When we follow that command it is an act of Submission n that men are equal before Him. 

The acknowledgment of peace in a more pleasant manner is demanded, paving the way for more productive n blessed interactions between men of peace. I don’t discriminate when giving my salam


The Business Case for Tahfiz Schools 

April 24, 2017

Many tahfiz schools have been mushrooming because there is a business case for such. It used to be Bangladeshis Darul this and Darul that. They set up a school with seed capital and then went round in Malaysia and Saudi and other countries to search for donations. 

Now Malaysian Ustazs are using the same business model. They set up a block, a dozen students and then go round to Saudi Arabia, Singapore and Brunei to raise more funds. Otherwise it will never be sustainable. 

They survive because there are selfish parents who Hope they will go to heaven if they have a Hafiz son or daughter and there are donors who think they are buying tickets to heaven. 


Racism against our very own 

April 13, 2017

I think we all need to get rid of that socialist feeling remaining in us, that everybody must be like us. The Malay society has changed. There are now different classes and levels of Malays. Used to be only 3; royals, nobles/civil servsnts, kampong peasants. Now even in kampong there are many wealthy Malays. 
It is also a gross mistake to brand others that do not share our political thoughts as stupid, that voters are stupid. That is the mistake by the pakatans after the last election. 
Now we see the trend that anything Malays hv to be attacked. Malays attacking malays . Chinese attacking Malays. Malays attacking Chinese. Malays are bashed by telling the Chinese that not enough Malays are speaking out against racism n injustice. Malays are being labelled racists. Pity those Malay reformists, whatever they hv done n shouted are just not good enough.
We all need to rise above all forms of bigotry n racism including against our own.


Sowing racial discord – Malay Bashings

April 13, 2017

I think we all need to get rid of that socialist feeling remaining in us, that everybody must be like us. The Malay society has changed. There are now different classes and levels of Malays. There used to be only 3; royals, nobles/civil servants, kampong peasants. Now even in kampong there are many wealthy Malays. 
It is also a gross mistake to brand others that do not share our political thoughts as stupid, that voters are stupid. That is the mistake by the pakatans just after the last election. 

Now we see the trend that anything Malays has  to be attacked. Malays attacking malays is encouraged . In communal relationships, Malays are bashed by telling the Chinese that not enough Malays are speaking out against injustice. Their reserved nature has  been taken as them being racists, condoning abuses or by DNA plain natural. 
Pity those Malay reformists, whatever they hv done n shouted are just not good enough. Malay boys are not spared, the term meleis bring rampantly used to break that little pride they have.