bravo!!! the special malay class is discontinued

The Minister of Education made that wise decision to discontinue the special Malay classes as proposed and planned by a few State Education offices. Well done Hisham!! Although it was done after oppositions from BN component members, good sense  and the spirit of the coalition prevailed.  Most importantly, the decision further strenghten the right honourable minister’s intent to make the national school the school of choice amongst Malaysians.

It does not make sense to segregate Malay students from the mainstream classes. The Ministry’s beurecrats  are  not doing the malay student a favour by initiating that program. To the contrary the students are being deprived of the opportunity to compete, to interact, to build their esteem, to develop friendships, to share, to work together to learn to be children of the world.

The proposal exposed a glaring flaw in the thinking process of those who have been entrusted to manage the education of our children.  And they are supposed to be well trained educationists. I am not impressed.

The special Malay class was a program in the fifties and sixties to assist poor, deprived malay kids who generally were weak in the command of English compared to their urban mates. It makes sense to allow them to play catch up in the early years of the secondary education.

 In the seventies it was discontinued. Personally I have benefitted from being in the mainstream, to be the best amongst the best.  I learn the meaning of competition, meritocracy and prepare me to take on the world.

Its revival in the new millenium demonstrates the deep seated sense of  insecurities amongst the malay beurecrats. The Malay kids of the millenium  do not need to inherit that sense of insecurities.

Hisham inherited a flawed education system. Many in the system are just not fit to be educationists. I once saw a talk show hosted by Abdul Razak Baginda. He was interviewing the then director General of Education. I was not impressed by the intellectual depth of the highest in Command, neither do I see any management nor leadership qualities. I saw a civil sevant whose job was perhaps managing his personal needs so as to protect his position as a beurecrat.

As rightfully pointed out by those opposing the initiative, the special malay classes kills the character of the National Schools.

Bravo Hisham!!! go and get rid of those bird brained in the system.

7 Responses to bravo!!! the special malay class is discontinued

  1. Azie says:

    I cant wait for this to come through.They need to travel downsouth and learn from the neighbouring country what it truly means world’s education system.Their system leaps beyond in terms of facilities , curriculums and teachers’ competence which I dare say world standard.
    I am fortunate as being a Singporean, bred and educated in an ever premiere college in Singapore, experienced the exposure of competitive learnings with the Chinese, Indians and other nationals of expatriate children. Everything is merit for us to move up.I learned to stand up to speak up to let the world knows for nobody else will do it for me.I learned to interact and integrate and make myself known to others and fight for what i want and need in life.I learned to ask because i will never know what is available for me untill i ask for it. All these through the process of survival competing amongst the various races in the education system which I was borned into.My children should not be deprived from what their mother has inherited.
    I have a choice to send them to Singapore school instead because of my Singapore origin but i still choose the Malaysian stream for i have my reasonings.I passed my inheritance of education experiences to them through my daily duties as a parent.Be at home or any where we are together, I teach them competitive learning to achieve the best always and see the best.Ever since we were in JB, we would make a point to enter Singapore in the weekend, deliberately,visiting the schools so as to let them see the aura of world’s school.As a result,which I believe, my children have been excelling in school competing to be the best.Shafiq the eldest who recently received his UPSR result did well achieving straight As despite having heavy dengue fever while sitting for the exam in the hospital. During the result announcement, his name was been called out by the principal as an examplary student with competence.For that moment instantaneously, tears rolled down for then I truly envisaged in me the feelings of fullfillments to see a son moving up the hurdles and excelled with flying colours.I am ever competitive as i was trained to be and so my next step is to see my son to be in the best school for his secondary education, elit or premiere, in the state or district, my son deserves to be amongst the best.
    While Shahid , my second son, has been enrolled to be in a boys school in BP well known for its multi-racial enrolment.His studies excelled too and he would be in the top class where 80% is non-malays.His principal is Chinese and so does his form teacher.I know I have to travel from Bagan to BP town everyday to send him to school for there is no school bus to cater him from Bagan.I can send him to nearby Bagan primary school for convenience sake but will that do him good if competition spirit is what we want from him.
    I truly believe a big price need to be paid, literaly or figuratively.I cannot wait for the Hisham’s agenda for my chlidren to benefit.I have to start driving it ahead so that my children will be on par the world’s mindset.They may live in kampong bagan yet they think like a world class citizen.

  2. Azie says:

    I cant wait for this to come through.They need to travel downsouth and learn from the neighbouring country what it truly means world’s education system.Their system leaps beyond in terms of facilities , curriculums and teachers’ competence which I dare say world standard.
    I am fortunate as being a Singporean, bred and educated in an ever premiere college in Singapore, experienced the exposure of competitive learnings with the Chinese, Indians and other nationals of expatriate children. Everything is merit for us to move up.I learned to stand up to speak up to let the world knows for nobody else will do it for me.I learned to interact and integrate and make myself known to others and fight for what i want and need in life.I learned to ask because i will never know what is available for me untill i ask for it. All these through the process of survival competing amongst the various races in the education system which I was borned into.My children should not be deprived from what their mother has inherited.
    I have a choice to send them to Singapore school instead because of my Singapore origin but i still choose the Malaysian stream for i have my reasonings.I passed my inheritance of education experiences to them through my daily duties as a parent.Be at home or any where we are together, I teach them competitive learning to achieve the best always and see the best.Ever since we were in JB, we would make a point to enter Singapore in the weekend, deliberately,visiting the schools so as to let them see the aura of world’s school.As a result,which I believe, my children have been excelling in school competing to be the best.Shafiq the eldest who recently received his UPSR result did well achieving straight As despite having heavy dengue fever while sitting for the exam in the hospital. During the result announcement, his name was been called out by the principal as an examplary student with competence.For that moment instantaneously, tears rolled down for then I truly envisaged in me the feelings of fullfillments to see a son moving up the hurdles and excelled with flying colours.I am ever competitive as i was trained to be and so my next step is to see my son to be in the best school for his secondary education, elit or premiere, in the state or district, my son deserves to be amongst the best.
    While Shahid , my second son, has been enrolled to be in a boys convent school in BP well known for its multi-racial enrolment.His studies excelled too and he would be in the top class where 80% is non-malays.His principal is Chinese and so does his form teacher.I know I have to travel from Bagan to BP town everyday to send him to school for there is no school bus to cater him from Bagan.I can send him to nearby Bagan primary school for convenience sake but will that do him good if competition spirit is what we want from him.
    I truly believe a big price need to be paid, literaly or figuratively.I cannot wait for the Hisham’s agenda for my chlidren to benefit.I have to start driving it ahead so that my children will be on par the world’s mindset.They may live in kampong bagan yet they think like a world class citizen.

  3. mooke says:

    kak azie…you should get a blog….i love your comments..

    along

  4. tolamhaha says:

    Just noticed this, anyway:

    While your views are commendable your factual basis regarding the “special Malay class” are shallow in speculative. While I’m no fan of Hisham, I believe we should state “facts” as how they are/were and not mislead others with conjectures and speculations, even tho’ unintentionally :
    (1) you should check out why the British started both English medium schools and Sekolah Melayu

    (2) Your statement “The special Malay class was a program in the fifties and sixties to assist poor, deprived malay kids who generally were weak in the command of English compared to their urban mates…”

    The Special Malay classes of the early 60s were not really for “special Malays” as in the sense you want to convey. It was a “transitionary system” for students who wanted to change from Sekolah Melayu to the Sekolah Jenis Kebangsaan Inggeris then, irregardless of their economic standings. It was open for all qualifying students, rich or poor – we had to pass a special exam – giving us the “special Malay status” in an English medium school, And there were quite a number of non-Malays in the Sekolahs Melayu then.

    “malay kids who generally were weak in the command of English compared to their urban mates…” WE WERE NOT WEAK, WE DIDN’T KNOW A SINGLE SENTENCE IN ENGLISH!!!

    (3) SO, “It makes sense to allow them to play catch up in the early years of the secondary education”…is ABSOLUTE RUBBISH!

    “segregate Malay students from the mainstream classes”. We were in the “special classes” only in Special Malay (SM) 1 and SM 2 after which the students from the SM system joined with the previous year’s Std 5 students in an integrated Standard 6 of Malays, Indians, Chinese and Siamese.

  5. inspigoblog says:

    Thank you sir for the clarifications on the facts of the special Malay Classes of the early 60s. While it served its purpose for your generation, I question the bureaucrats of the new Millennium, the rationale and need to introduce the program in the first decade of the new century.

    In the seventies the REMOVE CLASS was introduced to replace the special Malay Class. I went through that system, spending one whole year to study English, before joining the mainstream. It was zero English for me too on my first day of attending secondary school. . It was a year of learning the language which to me the best way to acquire a new language. I did not consider it a year lost. If I were to study a new language I would go through the same process which has proven to work. Not the PPSMI way!

    On a related subject, my son did the same thing. He acquired french and Spanish by attending Spanish and French Schools.If Malays have to wait for special malay classes, we will forever be monolingual.

  6. tolamhaha says:

    You still don’t get it buddy, there is ABSOLUTELY NO similarity between the SM system of the sixties and the one they wanted to introduce lately, even tho’ they may want to use the same name. There are no more Sekolahs Melayu or Sekolahs Umum or Sekolahs Jenis Kebangsaan Inggeris for the transition of Malay medium students to English medium schools. I’m not aware of any plan to resort to these systems to facilitate the creation of the SMC system “again”. You are talking about different ball parks

  7. inspigoblog says:

    Got it sir . Thank you

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